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Posts tagged as “Dorothy Dix”

Cupid and Poverty

From the Omaha Daily Bee, February 10, 1912. By Dorothy Dix.

Turn Defects Into Virtues

Don't refuse to run the race of life because you are handicapped. Instead, let your handicap be as a spur in your side to urge you on to more speed and effort and thus enable you to win out.

Cheerfulness

Did you ever think of cheerfulness as a financial asset - something that is money in your pocket, and that is legal tender for food and drink, and lodging and clothes, and with which you can buy success and popularity and all the good things of life?
Well, it is.

Come Into the Kitchen

I know an old man who has a standardized gift that he makes to every bride who invites him to her wedding. He invariably gives her a little savings bank book that he has opened for her with $50 deposited to her credit. And as he hands it to her he makes her a little speech that runs something like this.

Come Into the Kitchen

One of the curious effects of the war has been to almost annihilate the domestic servant. Nor is this servantless state a temporary epoch. It has come to stay. There will probably never again be the steady flow of immigration that supplied us with Noras, Thelmas, Marias and Roses.

The Road to Success

Mr. John Robert Gregg - the man who put the extra short in shorthand - was asked to address the graduating class of the secretarial course of the Central Y. W. C. A. in New York. Wishing to give these girls some really practical and helpful advice instead of the usual flubdub platitudes that are handed to the sweet girl graduate on such occasion, Mr. Gregg asked a number of business men with whom he habitually lunches what he should say.

The Blessing of Poverty

The one thing about poverty that the poor woman finds it harder to endure than everything else combined, is the thought that she cannot give her children the advantages that rich people can give theirs.

To the Sweetest Girl Graduate

You are just about to graduate in all the ologies and isms and a perfect dear of a white dress, and then, after you have hung your diploma on your bedroom wall, you will be wondering about the words of the song, "Where do we go from here?"