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The Federalist Papers

Initially published in three New York newspapers, the Federalist Papers are 85 essays written between October 1787 and May 1788. They were composed by three different authors: Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, all under the single anonymous pseudonym ‘Publius’. In these essays, Publius argues for approval of the United States Constitution, which had been sent to the states for ratification in the Fall of 1787. Today, these essays serve as a primary source for the interpretation of the United States Constitution. These essays are all narrated here, included as one of the greatest series to appear in American newspapers.

FEDERALIST NO. 85

Concluding Remarks
From McLEAN’S Edition, New York.
Author: Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST NO. 84

Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered
From McLEAN’S Edition, New York.
Author: Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST NO. 83

The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury
From McLEAN’S Edition, New York.
Author: Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST NO. 82

The Judiciary Continued
From McLEAN’S Edition, New York.
Author: Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST NO. 81

The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority
From McLEAN’S Edition, New York.
Author: Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST NO. 80

The Powers of the Judiciary
From McLEAN’S Edition, New York.
Author: Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST NO. 79

The Judiciary Department Continued
From McLEAN’S Edition, New York.
Author: Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST NO. 78

The Judiciary Department
From McLEAN’S Edition, New York.
Author: Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST NO. 77

The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered
From the New York Packet.
Friday, April 4, 1788.
Author: Alexander Hamilton